Monthly Archives: January 2020

IoT

We, in the US, are starting to  talk more widely about the dangers posed by Internet of Things (IoT) devices. This is great!

IoT devices are by and large terrible. They’re truly horrendous. They can be nice in a lot of ways — I enjoy controlling the music in the kitchen from my phone — but they normalize the situation where we trade our privacy and data for convenience. This is not just true of obvious surveillance technologies, though it is especially true for them and I want to talk about those.

Most of the conversation I have seen about surveillance IoT — like Ring doorbells and home surveillance devices — is focused on the insecurity of it. Major news outlets covered when a girl was harassed by someone hacking into a Ring camera her parents installed into her bedroom.

Ignoring how creepy it is that her parents decided to install a camera in her bedroom, this story is disturbing because it’s about someone violating the sanctity of what should be a safe space for a family and, moreso, for a child. This is posed as a security issue affecting an individual.

We need to shift the conversation in two ways:

1) No amount of security will make these kind of devices safe;

and

2) This is not just about the individual — these types of surveillance put communities at risk.

I think the latter is the more important point, and something I want to focus on. The conversation should not just be about the security risk of someone breaking into my home surveillance. Instead it should focus on how, for example, surveillance systems are putting your neighbors at risk, especially as these systems are being co-opted by law enforcement and faulty facial recognition tech is being used.

We should talk about how victims of domestic violence and stalking can be monitored and tracked more easily by their abusers.

I believe strongly that the people making decisions, designing, building, and selling these technologies have a responsibility to the people who purchase them as well as those who come in contact with them. I view broadening the conversations beyond the “unhackability” of devices as a necessary next step.