MollyGive 2019

After much deliberation, I decided to not do MollyGive 2019. This was a bit of a blow, especially after MollyGive 2018 having a lot less reach than previous years. (For MollyGive 2018 I supported a large, matching donation to the Software Freedom Conservancy.)

I’ve spent the past seven months paying helping a friend pay their rent. I’ve paid for groceries, train tickets, meals, coffee, books for people I know and people I don’t. Medications for strangers. I stopped keeping track of the “good” I was doing, and instead just gave when I saw people in need.

This is counter to my past behavior. I’ve been burned a few times when offering funds to people who have a major need in their life — thousands of dollars to help people make major life changes only to have them instead use the money on other things.

I believe pretty strongly that, generally, people in need know what they need and are capable of taking care of it themselves. I don’t think it’s my place to dictate or prescribe. The experience of being burned and my thought about people knowing what they need were at odds.

At the same time, I saw people suffering around me. People who know what they needed .People in positions I’ve been in: food or medication? A winter jacket or rent? I have the resources to take care of those material needs, so I supported them when the opportunity presented itself.

I have a friend who is scheduled to have surgery this spring. They have been given advice on how to fundraise for the surgery. In fact, people facing  the prospect of life saving, crushing debt generating treatments are given lots of information about how to run successful crowd funding campaigns. This is appalling. You should be disgusted by it. You need to be disgusted by it.

Giving to charity helps. Giving to your neighbors helps. However, this is not enough. The sheer level of suffering and injustice in the world, in your country, your neighborhood, your home is sickening and giving ourselves a reprieve by donating to charities will not fix these systemic problems.

All of that being said, I have made donations to non-profits, and will make more. I hope you’ll join me in supporting groups that are doing good, necessary work. I also hope you’ll join me in striving to bring about the big societal changes that will make it so we don’t need so many charities.

My career has been in non-profits, it is my dearest hope to one day be out of a job. In the mean time, I’ll continue to work, and I’ll continue to give in whatever ways I can.